Cape Town’s Aspirational Leap towards Electric Vehicles

4 mins read
electric vehicles myciti programme

Cape Town is taking impressive steps towards embracing green transportation, with a focus on the MyCiTi programme and incorporating 30 electric buses in Phase 2A. The city has allocated R668 million to MyCiTi buses in the next three years and plans to electrify its entire vehicle fleet, including waste collection trucks, light delivery vehicles, sedans, and hatchbacks. This approach is part of a broader goal to convert the entire vehicle fleet to electric power and achieve carbon neutrality by 2050. The city’s initial step towards electrification was a successful pilot project involving five fully electric BMW i3s for the Traffic Services Department.

What is Cape Town’s approach towards electric vehicles?

Cape Town is committed to adopting greener transportation alternatives, starting with the MyCiTi programme and incorporating 30 electric buses in its Phase 2A expansion. The city has allocated R668 million to MyCiTi buses in the next three years and plans to electrify its entire vehicle fleet, including waste collection trucks, light delivery vehicles, sedans, and hatchbacks. The initial steps towards electrification were taken in 2020 with a pilot project involving five fully electric BMW i3s for the Traffic Services Department.

Adopting an environmentally conscious perspective, Cape Town is making significant strides towards embracing electric vehicles. The city’s emphasis is strategically directed towards the MyCiTi programme, with the aim of incorporating 30 electric buses. This initiative signifies a crucial step in the city’s journey to integrate greener transportation alternatives.

Rob Quintas, the Urban Mobility Mayoral Committee Member of the city, disclosed this eco-friendly strategy as a component of the MyCiTi Phase 2A expansion. This expansion has been designed to form convenient transit links between Khayelitsha, Mitchells Plain, Claremont, and Wynberg. Managed by the Cape Town Urban Mobility Directorate, the tender for the electric buses is planned to close in mid-July, signifying a swift acceleration towards Cape Town’s electric vision.

This initiative is not a standalone effort, but rather a fragment of a broader financial commitment.

Extensive Budget Allocation for Eco-Friendly Transport

The fiscal plan of the city for 2024/25, released last month, designates R668 million to the MyCiTi buses in the next three years. In a broader context, around R6.3 billion has been allocated for the MyCiTi south-east expansion during the same timeframe. This substantial expenditure emphasizes the city’s commitment to the MyCiTi programme, ensuring sufficient funding for the fare collection system and control centre.

However, Cape Town’s electric aspirations are not confined to buses. Theresa Uys, the Mayoral Committee Member for Corporate Services, announced that the city is contemplating electrifying other segments of its vehicle fleet too. This includes waste collection trucks, light delivery vehicles, sedans, and hatchbacks. This approach is in line with the city’s long-term goal of converting its entire vehicle fleet to electric power, aiming for carbon neutrality by 2050.

The Initial Steps Towards Electrification

Cape Town embarked on its electrification journey in 2020 with a pilot project that involved the acquisition of five fully electric BMW i3s for the Traffic Services Department. These electric vehicles were meant to replace the Golf GTIs, which had an average annual mileage of 50,000 km. Even though these vehicles were less utilized than their internal combustion engine equivalents, the city considered the pilot successful, demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles.

Unquestionably, Cape Town’s entry into the world of electric transportation is not an isolated event. Electric buses are being planned for deployment across the nation.

National Drive Towards Electric Transportation

For instance, by the end of 2025, the Development Bank of South Africa is financing the deployment of 39 electric buses in Tshwane and eThekwini, bolstering the countrywide movement towards electrification.

Even though electric vehicles and hybrids currently constitute a minor part of new car sales in South Africa, they are progressively gaining ground. In 2023, these vehicles made up 1.45% of the new car sales, breaking the 1% barrier for the first time – an encouraging indication for the future of electric transportation in the country. Sales of hybrid vehicles were noticeably seven times greater than that of electric vehicles, hinting at a rising market acceptance for these eco-friendly options.

This emerging trend is being nurtured by significant investments in electric vehicle charging infrastructure by companies such as Gridcars and Zero Carbon Charge. These initiatives are vital in encouraging the adoption and usage of electric vehicles, thereby supporting Cape Town – and the entire country – in moving towards a more sustainable future.

What vehicles will Cape Town electrify?

Cape Town plans to electrify its entire vehicle fleet, including waste collection trucks, light delivery vehicles, sedans, and hatchbacks. This initiative is part of the city’s goal to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050.

How much money has Cape Town allocated for MyCiTi buses?

Cape Town has allocated R668 million to MyCiTi buses in the next three years. The fiscal plan for 2024/25 designates this amount for the MyCiTi buses, and around R6.3 billion has been allocated for the MyCiTi south-east expansion during the same timeframe.

What was Cape Town’s initial step towards electrification?

Cape Town’s initial step towards electrification was a successful pilot project involving five fully electric BMW i3s for the Traffic Services Department. These electric vehicles were meant to replace the Golf GTIs, demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles.

What is the national drive towards electric transportation in South Africa?

South Africa is making significant strides towards adopting greener transportation alternatives, including electric buses. For instance, the Development Bank of South Africa is financing the deployment of 39 electric buses in Tshwane and eThekwini by the end of 2025, bolstering the countrywide movement towards electrification.

What is the market acceptance for electric and hybrid vehicles in South Africa?

Electric and hybrid vehicles currently constitute a minor part of new car sales in South Africa. However, in 2023, these vehicles made up 1.45% of the new car sales, breaking the 1% barrier for the first time. Sales of hybrid vehicles were noticeably seven times greater than that of electric vehicles, hinting at a rising market acceptance for these eco-friendly options.

What companies are investing in electric vehicle charging infrastructure in South Africa?

Companies such as Gridcars and Zero Carbon Charge are investing in electric vehicle charging infrastructure in South Africa. These initiatives are vital in encouraging the adoption and usage of electric vehicles, thereby supporting Cape Town and the entire country in moving towards a more sustainable future.

Previous Story

Crucial Eviction Mandate Approved for Illicit Settlements in Cape Town

Next Story

On the Hunt for Perfect Players: Kaizer Chiefs Eye Seasoned Strikers

Latest from Blog

The Political Journey of John Steenhuisen: Overcoming Educational Barriers

John Steenhuisen’s lack of formal education has been a subject of criticism in South African politics, but it has not hindered his rise to the leadership of the Democratic Alliance. Steenhuisen’s political path is marked by an unflagging commitment to public service rather than academic accomplishments. His sharp comebacks to critics demonstrate his belief that moral uprightness should be the key measure of public service. Steenhuisen’s career serves as a testament to the idea that success in politics is not always linked to conventional educational routes.

Mandela Day: A Commemoration of Unity and Artistry in Khayelitsha and Mitchells Plain

Mandela Day, celebrated on July 18th, honors Nelson Mandela’s dedication to social justice and encourages individuals to take action against poverty and inequality. The day is marked by community initiatives and the power of art to foster positive change. The Legacy Mural Initiative in Mitchells Plain and the Sinethemba Community Project in Khayelitsha are examples of communitybased initiatives that use art and unity to combat socioeconomic obstacles and promote community development. These initiatives demonstrate the potential of collaborative efforts to yield positive change and highlight the pivotal role that every individual can play in shaping their community.

A World of Experiences awaits in the Heart of Winter

Escape the winter blues in Cape Town with a range of exciting events. From tribute concerts to Abba and the Beatles, to a celebration of vineyards at the Wild Fig Winter Wine Festival, there is something for everyone. Swing and 80s parties are also on offer, as well as a Shakespearean classic revisited. These events promise warmth, happiness, and cultural immersion during the chilly winter season.

The Tumultuous Tale of Coreth Naudé: A Tax Probe and Attempted Murder

The attempted murder of Coreth Naudé, a SARS advocate investigating businesswoman Shauwn Mkhize’s unpaid taxes, has sparked media attention and speculation. Mkhize, known as “MaMkhize,” has been accused of owing R37 million in taxes and was recently ordered to remit R12 million and have 13 of her luxury vehicles confiscated by SARS. This ongoing saga highlights the complex interplay between power, tax evasion, and the quest for justice.

The Clash in Serenity: Drug Bust in George

Police in George intercepted a drug shipment worth R340,000, arresting a 55yearold Tanzanian man for drug trafficking. The police squad found 979 grams of tik hidden under the passenger seat of a blue Lexus with Gauteng Province license plates. This successful operation showcases the tireless efforts of law enforcement agencies in the ceaseless battle against drugs.